How to Punish Corns with Pumice

When considering the tools humanity has mastered over its existence, those made of stone rank among the first we likely mastered. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t still some things we can learn about using them, especially when it comes to a special type like pumice. It might not have the superb bashing and bonking properties of a fine piece of granite, but a pumice stone can be a fine tool for taking care of corns—if you use it correctly.

The composition of a pumice stone makes it a worthy tool for removing dead skin off a corn. The key word here is “dead.” You are not going to get rid of it by grating at your foot like it was a block of parmesan cheese. Do this and eventually you’re going to hit skin that’s still alive, causing pain and potentially opening up a wound that could bleed and get infected. In fact, because of this risk, we do not recommend that patients who have diabetes or poor circulation use pumice—at least not without consulting us first.

If you’re still on board and willing to be patient, here’s a good routine to use:

  1. First, clean your stone with warm water and an antibacterial soap, reducing the risk of infection just on the off chance you do go too deep.
  2. Submerge your foot in a container of warm, soapy water (a mild, moisturizing liquid soap is ideal) to clean it and help soften the corn.
  3. Begin to rub the stone gently over the dry skin, using only light pressure.
  4. After a minute or two, rinse your foot off to remove excess materials and begin to rub gently again. Stop before you hit healthy skin.
  5. Once again, wash your foot with soap and warm water when finished. Apply a moisturizing cream or lotion.

Careful use of pumice will help keep corns at bay and prevent discomfort from their rubbing up against shoes. If you need additional help with corns or any other skin conditions, please give Dr. Kevin Powers a call at (812) 333-4422. Our Bloomington office staff is ready to schedule an appointment with you.